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STV Two-Seater 19

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STV Two-Seater 19 From Hot Boat Magazine-1993

 

   Those people even marginally acclimated to the buoy-busting world of high-horse, low-pound, tunnel-boat racing know the names of Roark Summerford and Rusty Campbell, who between them have churned out dozens of major circuit wins and raked in sea-son after season of championship spoils. Off the course the two spend much of their time refining the STV (Summerford Tunnel-V), a pleasure boat design that mimics the performance of the team's sleek racing brood. Created for the lunatic fringe of performance enthusiasts who place top-end speed and rocket like acceleration above all other priorities, the STV is a legitimate, tried-and-true 100-mph tunnel hull that blasts its occupants within sniffing range of race-level performance.

 

   While STV has made some concessions to creature comfort and cosmetics in recent years, their throttle-down approach remains true with the 19-foot two-seater. But though the STV's Pro-Comp offers an admittedly cramped rear jumper, the in-line seating for two isn't unworkable. The approach to this new model is a simple one: Eliminate the back seat and replace it with the same aerodynamic cowling design that can be found on the 130-mph race boat, enclose the deck-to eliminate all possible drag-and put as much power to the boat as possible.

 

   Executed flawlessly in our test boat, the results of this outlook proved exhilarating and showed once again that STV is one of only a few builders that can deliver on promises of relatively safe, 100-mph-plus performance. Put the STV's $22,000 bottom-line price (which includes Mercury's muscle-bound 2.5) into the equation. and you get insight into why STV is gaining ground annually in the high-performance pleasure ranks.

 

THE PACKAGE

 

   STVs clients are interested in maximum performance and the company remains fixed on that end throughout the building process. In a Summerford tunnel-V the fun begins at about 55 mph; before that the sensation is of running at idle speeds. Those people seriously considering this type of boat should have long ago lost the desire to own a family weekender with a few performance enhancements thrown in. The STV feels like a race boat: solid but light, with more consideration devoted to weight management than passenger comfort. With the idea of comfort put in proper perspective, the core speed enthusiast can get down to business: performance above all!

 

   The menacing 2.5 blends smoothly into the super-light race cowling; our 1,200-pound test package looked as if it had inadvertently drifted off the race course into our test session. Standard features include a 2-gallon fuel capacity, snap-in seat covers and dual steering. Foot-throttle and wheel-mounted trim are, of course, standard. There is no carpeting: The bulkheads are gel-coated. The gauges are mounted on a fairing-type dash, just as in race machines. Drink holders are included in the basic package.

 

   We found the seating to be extremely hard (thicker padding wouldn't have added that much weight), and the wide-bodied driver can just about forget any semblance of comfort once nestled into the cockpit. We found the omission of a speedometer in the STV's basic, easily legible gauge cluster somewhat mystifying. With a rocket like this you want to know how fast you're going! The test boat did include, however, an optional quick-disconnect steering hub ($65), Nydahl cable steering (no additional charge) and mirror package ($95). It was built on STV's optional, double-biaxial Kevlar lamination schedule, adding another $250. While the installation is somewhat bare-bones in concept, the basics are rock solid. The glass work is extremely clean, and the test boat's mirror finish is impressive. We found traces of leftover silicone in obscure areas, but for the most part the installation is sound and sanitary. Two gel coat colors are neatly (aped and capably sprayed, they're accented with taped graphics. STV's pleasure bottoms are competition-proven and unmodified from their competitive ancestry. Basically they're air-trapping tunnels with con-vex center keels, enhanced by a series of graduating lifting strakesthe Mod-VP running surface does its job.

 

PERFORMANCE

 

   We were pleasantly surprised with the STV's maneuverability in all directions, around the docks and at low speeds. Goosing the throttle brought this responsive tunnel immediately to attention, and it planes in an impressive 3.5 seconds; its three-blade Mazco 14¼ x 30 RE prop brings it on top without a trace of slippage. What makes STV's hull such a recreational triumph is not so much its penchant for 100-plus-mph river romps, but its manageability between idle and top end. It handles beautifully at cruising speeds, turning effortlessly and responsively throughout its 8300-rpm range. Its race-boat personality is ever-present in the stable but extremely rigid ride. The 19-footer immediately transmits every signal to its driver and demands prompt response. Punching the throttle at 55 mph delivers neck-snapping acceleration that promises yet another dimension, one buried just beneath the hair-trigger throttle, Few driving experiences, tunnel-bred or otherwise, offer the drive a clearer feel for what's happening beneath him.

 

   This is no straight-line wonder; the STV can turn. Cautiously at first, we snaked this maneuverable little two seater through our buoy course. I responded in spades as we picked up more rpm, and it held its edge relentlessly as we pushed it through a series of high-speed turns. Its acceleration is blinding. It is nearly impossible to resist the temptation of repeated throttle-mashing. We found 40 mph in 5.9 seconds and 60 mph in an incredible 9.75 seconds. Sixty to 80 mph is a blur in this boat, at 80 mph the 2.5 finally seems to have to work for more velocity. The flip side to all this performance is the requirement that the STV owner actually drive the boat and not merely point it. It responds immediately to changes in water conditions, as well as to gusts; as with most designs translated from the race course, this one needs proper attention from its driver. Seat time is required to probe its maximum potential, a fact illustrated by the disparity between the speeds logged by our experienced test drivers (91 mph) and owner Rusty Campbell (109mph). Even an experienced performance enthusiast cannot jump in the seat and click out 100-mph passes.

 

THE BOTTOM LINE

 

   If an eye-popping, white-knuckle adrenaline surge is your ultimate destination, the STV is a capable carriage for the journey. Built by racers for those who would like to be, the appropriately powered two-seater pumps pure exhilaration into the hot-boating experience and guarantees its owner the potential for being one of the fastest boats on the lake. As might be expected, such practical considerations as passenger comfort and storage space fall by the wayside during the pursuit of this kind of power. But to the focused, serious performance fringe, the STV delivers one of the best returns on the dollar.

 

Specifications

 

Length 19'

Beam 86"

Bottom configuration Modified tunnel

Weight as tested 1,200 lbs.

Base retail price (less motor) $8,000

Price as tested, Incl. trailer $22,000

 

Options on Test Boot

 

Quick-disconnect steering hub ($65), Nydahi steering (no additional charge), mirrors ($95), double biaxial Kevlar lay-up ($250).

 

Power/Drive

 

Mercury 2.5 EFI outboard (260 hp)

 

Standard Equipment

 

Dual steering, 28'-gallon tank, snap-out upholstery, drink holders.

 

Performance

 

Top speed, radar 109 mph

 

Planing time 3.5 seconds

0-30 3.86 seconds

0-40 5.9 seconds

0-60 9.75 seconds

0-TS 22.9 seconds

 

SUMMERFORD RACING TEAM

 

 

Used with permission from Hot Boat Magazine

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ncjoyota    0

where would one go about getting a new STV hull? I cant find any STV websites where they would advert some new ones for sale....

eventually I think I might get a liberator hull new, but if there are some STV's that I like I could be swayed in that direction.. but I cant seem to find any

forgive me if this sounds like a newbie question... but I am a newbie

Joe

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Techno    0

The molds were recently sold by triad to someones name who isn't yet etched in my brain. There is a post somewhere mentioning announcing this though.

Hes spoda be starting soon on building the STVs.

DON"T BUY A LIBERATOR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This post might be kind of lost and unseen by most. You might want to ask this in the general area just to get more opinions than mine though.

I don't know much about the other boats but for some reason liberator seems to settle far down the ladder of what you should get. There are other better boats. Better built and better performance.

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Hi Joe;

The person you need to contact about "NEW" STV's is,

Jack Barsh at Full Throttle Power Boats. They are the company that build

Quarter Shot Performance Boats with great success I might add.

I wish I had the dough, to go in search of a new STV as they are in

very capable hands and have a very bright future with FTPB IMHO.

There contact info is:

www.fullthrottlepowerboats.com

Jacksonville, Florida

904-448-4029

Regards,

Bruce. :)

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ncjoyota    0
Hi Joe;

The person you need to contact about "NEW" STV's is,

Jack Barsh at Full Throttle Power Boats. They are the company that build

Quarter Shot Performance Boats with great success I might add.

I wish I had the dough, to go in search of a new STV as they are in

very capable hands and have a very bright future with FTPB IMHO.

There contact info is:

www.fullthrottlepowerboats.com

Jacksonville, Florida

904-448-4029

Regards,

Bruce. :)

I saw jack barsh race last weekend, in his general lee boat... he blew a motor, but until then it sounded really neat.. I have never heard a v8 2 stroke

full throttle power boats are really nice! I have 2 friends that have quatershots. they seem heavy, but very nicely setup I took a new QS out and eased it up to 104 by GPS speedo .. felt really smooth, other than a few short hop zones

perhaps when full throttle gets their STV part of the site up and running, Ill do some comparrisons on a hull

thanks

Joe

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STVMatt    0

they are charging more for an stv than a quartershot. 3 or 4000 more. the quartershots can be as

light as you want, pm rpmracing, he has one that is real light.

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