Jump to content
Administrator

Euro hull cracks

Recommended Posts

I guess it had to happen sooner or later but I have a minor hull crack. The seem at the top of the transom that mates the top cap came loose. Looks like just the adhesive came loose but there is a slight movement between where the joints were. I would say about 1/8inch. Inspection inside and outside show no other cracks. All the braces, knee braces are fine with no visible cracking in the glass. I think the problem may have been caused by taking 2 larger guests for a ride and their total weight is about 400lbs. One was in the back seat. The water was rough but we didn't go more than 40mph. Here is what I was thinking of doing, grind out the old adhesive, clean it up and inject 3M-5200 fast cure into the joint. I'm not sure what was orignally used but it's a very hard offwhite colored stuff.  Any suggestions and what's the proper way to do the repair!

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear that.  Any chance you can post pics so guys qualified to respond might have a better idea of what your dealing with.

Anyone ever put any addition support under the rear seat to take the weight of the back where the hinges attach?

EuroComp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Larry,

Have the same separation on my '95 Euro. I know you have a '98,but after speaking with Wally, he says its because the cap ,and bottom weren't bonded together.  You should give him a call. Since my plan was to remove the motor/jackplate

for prep for my shorty mid, while its apart taking it to Triad for a nice clean fix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone mentioned the seat was the culprit in Euros. Seems the problem with 400lbs added to it and then it cracked.

I had way more weight in my PSC as water and nothing like this cracking happened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used a Dremel type bit to clean out all the old adhesive to about 3/4 inch deep. The farther I went in the less visible the crack was and wondering how deep I should go. I estimate the transom at that point is about 2 inches thick. Next which type of adhesive should I use? Was thinking of 3M-5200 but wondering if there is an epoxy or something more suited to doing the job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5200 is great stuff, but still somewhat flexible.  I'd say have a glass guy put some resin in there.  Once it's dry, it will be hard as it should be.

I've got the same issue on my PCS.  The engine twisting the transom (pulls at the top with engine power) tries to do exactly what is happening.  I am going to add an aluminum brace to the inside down the knee braces, then pull it all together with a transom plate.  Once it's in place, THEN seal it up with resin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I been busy reading about adhesives last night and think I'm going with West exoxy products along with a high density fiber which is for repairs that have repeated load/unload cycles. As for a brace my inside plates are 3/8 inch thick aluminum which I was thinking of extending them about 12 inches down each side brace and use 2 bolts on each side. This I would think should stop the crack from coming back. Attched picture is from the inside.

Since it looks like all the load is on the top do I need to do the same for the lower mounting bolts?

post-1-1059002245.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI, the brace I am building is 4" wide at the transom bolts, 1/2" aluminum.  Once 4" strip for the top bolts, one for the bottom.  The two are joined at the joint to the knee braces to 3/8" aluminum which will extend forward 18" and have a 3/8" backing plate on the other side of the knee to pull through.  4 1/2" bolts on the top (coming down at an angle to the point) and 3 on the bottom.  I'll get pics once the boat comes back from the glass guy and the brace goes in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what I did with my cousin's Euro was to construct a plate that covered the back of the transom covering all four engine bolts- two plates welded on the sides that ran down the stringer- no more than 5-6 inches-more is just over kill- the key to finishing it off was I cut a piece of aluminium that ran between the jack plate  3 inches wide which sits flush on the transom- through bolt it using two 1/2 bolts-this is the most effective way to pinch the transom back together again. The outer plate and jackplate externally and the internal plate will bring it back to factory new, once bolted- infact, as you tighten you will see the pulled part come back in.make sure what is exposed is dry then seal it up with 3M- two season with this approach and my cousin's rig is perfect.

paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paulb, do you have pictures of how it was done? I just got done making a template from wood to make the inside braces. I also have a CMC jackplate and was thinking of getting welded a plate between the brackets that bolt to the transom and this should keep it(transom) straighter.

Later, it's late

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Larry,

Mine looks exactly like yours,  has since I got it and I am sure for many years prior.  The transom is still solid and has ZERO flex.  I wouldnt sweat it too much.  I garrantee if you glass it up it will crack again.  Never seen one that didnt.  I just used some marine sealer to insure no water gets in and left it at that.  

Good luck.

Sean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I been busy over the last week working on the transom brace to make sure nothing else happens again. I removed the engine, CMC plate, fuel tank and did an inspection to see if I could find any cracks in the knee braces and nothing was found. With the help of a local metal fabrication shop we came up with the brackets pictured below.

Picture #1 they are made from 1/2 & 3/8" aluminum stock and welded along with 2 gussets per bracket.

Picture #2 the CMC plate has an additional brace added near the top just encase it was flexing some. Also I had the lower original brace welded.

Picture # 3 was a test fit

Picture #4 was after the transom holes were drilled in the plates. The cross plates were what I had before.

My plans/ideas are to install the CMC plate along with sealer around the bolts and then snug them down to seat everything. After that loosen the transom bolts about an 1/8 inch and pull the plates forward. Next step is to drill and tighten the 4 3/8inch bolts on each brace that go into the side knees. Then final torque the 4 bolts through the CMC plate and pull it all together. I figure that 1/8inch gap I had should pre-load the transom. After that the final step is to use an epoxy to flow into the crack at the top of the transom.

post-1-1059789904.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

had my motor off the stv recently and figured as long as it was off, I may as well add a little extra beef to the transome. Cheap insurace with just a little work.

I preloaded it by putting a set of washers on the bolts bewteen the inside of the transome and the braces making up a little less than an 1/8 inch. Bolted the braces on the transome (with the washers in between). Drilled the holes in the knees through the pre-drilled holes in the braces. Took the braces back off, removed the washers, and then reinstalled the braces flush with the transome.

I wish I would have weighed them before intalation, but forgot to. Oh well, a little extra weight vs. a little extra strength... I'll take the latter.

see ya,

fish.

post-785-1109528334.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×